Equal Pay Day

Equal Pay Day was established nearly 21 years ago. The date symbolizes how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year. On Equal Pay Day, wearing RED is a symbol of how far in the RED women are when it comes to pay equality.

 

 

Equal Pay for Equal Work

In the run up to Equal Pay Day, we shone a light on the fact that women still earn significantly less than men annually — with the help of a certain caped crusader.

Learn more!

 

 

Guide to Women’s Equal Pay Rights published by the Department of Labor

When women are not paid fairly, not only do they suffer, but so do their families

Women make up nearly half of the U.S. labor force and are a growing number of breadwinners in their families. More women are also working in positions and fields that have been traditionally occupied by men.When women are not paid fairly, not only do they suffer, but so do their families.

“Most private sector employees have the right to join together, with or without a union, to improve their wages and working conditions under the National Labor Relations Act.”

 

 

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Fact Sheet on Pay Secrecy published by the Department of Labor

Pay Secrecy

In 2012, women who worked year-round, full-time earned seventy-seven cents (77¢) for every dollar their male counterparts earned.i Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly held by women, occupations predominantly held by men, or occupations with a more even composition of men and women.ii

“Nearly half of all workers nationally reported that they were either contractually forbidden or strongly discouraged from discussing their pay with their colleagues.”

 

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An Employer's Guide to Equal Work

Our nation’s workforce includes more women than ever before.

comprise almost half of the U.S. labor force and are a growing number of breadwinners in their families. More women are also working in positions and fields that have been traditionally occupied by men. Despite continued progress toward gender equality in the workplace, there still exists a significant earnings gap between women and men. The gap is larger for minority women and women with disabilities.

“Despite continued progress toward gender equality in the workplace, there still exists a significant earnings gap between women and men.”

 

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Pie Chart from the Department of Labor
 

    Recommended Reading List

  • Negotiating at Work: Turn Small Wins into Big Gains, by Deborah Kolb and Jessica L. Porter
  • Grace and Grit, by Lilly Ledbetter
  • 20 Years After First Equal Pay Day, Men Still Outpace Women by Susan Milligan
  • Better Data Equals Better Pay Equality
  • Senate and House versions of the Paycheck Fairness Act
  • Handy Reference Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act